I recently discovered a super fun stitch that is perfect for any number of projects, especially pieces that need a good dose of firmness, texture, and depth. It is so unique, in fact, that I haven’t been able to track down what this stitch is actually called! It mimics a wrapped stitch, but doesn’t. It almost looks like a cable, but it isn’t. All I know is that you are going to enjoy it!

For today, I am calling the stitch a “Wrapped Increase” and here’s how you work it:

Step 1: Work to where the wrapped increase will go. Insert your right-hand needle between the 2nd and 3rd stitches.

Step 2: Wrap your yarn around as if to knit and pull the new stitch back through to the front. This is the wrapped increase stitch.

Step 3: Keep the wrapped increase on the right-hand needle, in front of stitches 1 and 2.

Step 4: Knit the next 2 stitches as normal.

Stitch Sampling by Tabetha Hedrick

This is what the wrapped increase looks like when worked:

Cable Look-alike2

Continue working your pattern as normal and then on the wrong side row;

Step 5: Work until 1 stitch before the wrapped increase loop. Purl 2 together (you are decreasing that stitch into Stitch 1 from the right side row). You can see in the next image what the decrease will look like.

Cable Look-alike3

Here’s a simple stitch pattern utilizing the Cable Look-alike stitch, worked over a multiple of 4 sts (making it VERY easy to memorize and work). Perfect for afghans, washcloths, scarves, hats, or cowls, you’ll enjoy this interesting stitch.

Stitch chart Cable Look-alike4

Side note: This tutorial of mine originally appeared in the Editor’s Blog over at Creative Knitting. I’m a regular contributor there (on the blog, newsletter, magazine… GRIN!), so I hope you go check it out and support us! 🙂

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2 thoughts on “Tutorial Tuesday: Cable Look-alike

  • February 4, 2015 at 10:16 am
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    how many sts do you need to cast on multiple of #

    Reply
    • Tabetha
      February 4, 2015 at 1:09 pm
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      Hi Kathy, The stitch pattern is a multiple of 4. 🙂

      Reply

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